Borderline Personality Disorder: The Role of the Agency and the System

A lack of purpose and direction in treatment has been one of the factors contributing to feeling drained when working with patients and clients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder. This draining propensity is rather common; it adds to negative countertransference and leads to clinician resistance to working with these patients and clients.

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Mentorship: A Tribute to my Mentor: Charmaine Rapaport, MD

The Oxford Dictionary defines Mentorship as, “The guidance provided by a mentor, especially an experienced person in a company or educational institution.” The entire medical field is founded upon a system of mentorship. “To hold my teacher in this art equal to my own parents; to make him partner in my livelihood; when he is in need of money to share mine with him; to consider his family as my own brothers, and to teach them this art, if they want to learn it, without fee or indenture; to impart precept, oral instruction, and all other instruction to my own sons, the sons of my teacher, and to indentured pupils who have taken the physician’s oath…” is the second paragraph of the Hippocratic oath taken by all physicians upon graduation from medical school.

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Borderline Personality Disorder: Clinicians’ Responsibility

Prior to learning the skills, exploring the reasons why of the skills helps put things into context and helps prepare the terrain for a successful implementation. Strong Countertransference, Draining Propensity, and Splitting Ability are the three reasons why it is crucial for us as clinicians to learn and master the skills for working with patients and clients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder.

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Borderline Personality Disorder: What Is Needed

Characterized by a long-term pattern of an unstable sense of self, unstable relationships with others, and profound difficulties with self-regulation, Borderline Personality Disorder is the most common of the ten personality disorders. A prevalence of 1.6% makes it more common than Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder, and, sadly, it has been highly stigmatized both by the non-clinician and us, the mental health professional and provider.

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The Silence of Trauma

Millions of individuals are affected by the sequelae of trauma, many of them, in silence. The effects of chronic trauma tend to be cumulative, because each event serves as a reminder of the prior trauma and reinforces its negative impact. A child or adolescent who has been exposed to a series of traumas may become increasingly inundated with each subsequent event and more convinced that the world is not a safe place.

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Integrated Care: Operationalizing it!

Integrated care is the type of care that is provided to our patients and clients, in the most holistic way possible, and the least fragmented way possible, taking into consideration each individual’s needs regarding all the spheres of hers or his lives, including (and not limited to) the physical part, the mental health component, the behavior sphere, lifestyle, among others.

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How do I talk with my patient or client about … ? (Part II)

“I have been talking with Peter about diabetes, and we were working on starting an exercise regimen. He recently started to talk about his migraine medication.”  Kate eagerly articulated these words to Roger, who then responded, “We will get to talk about medications. But before we do so, let us discuss the remaining 7 of the 12 most common physical health conditions.”

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