Training Your Clinicians: 5 Reasons Why

Training Your Clinicians: 5 Reasons why

“I am working on a training grant for our clinicians, and I need key points to add. Can you recommend some?” Carol, the director of the grant department, at the HOPE Care Center articulated these words in consultation with Rodis. 

“The key points to make in a training grant application are various, some more obvious than others. As a start, let us look at the reasons why agencies should make training available to their clinicians,” responded Rodis.

 

There are, indeed, many key points in favor of training for our clinicians, and as Rodis said, looking at the reasons why, we, as agencies and leaders, should be training our clinicians is a good start.  Here are five reasons why:

 

Productivity

Training Your Clinicians: 5 Reasons Why

In a series of articles on productivity, six of the ten key strategies to increase clinician productivity are related to training.  Those six strategies are the following:

 

(1) Help them on New Strategies for Initial Mental Health Assessment;

(2) Help them with De-escalation Skills;

(3) Help them on New Strategies for Substance Use Assessment;

(4) Train them on Basic Integrated Care Skills;

(5) Train them on Basic Psychopharmacology Knowledge; and

(6) Help them address the Social Determinants of Health.  
 

While these six core competencies highly correlate with an increase in productivity, several related skills like patient and client engagement, working with specialized or challenging patient populations, or proficiency in treatment interventions, like CBT or DBT will go a long way. 

 

Agency reputation

Training Your Clinicians: 5 Reasons Why

In a series of articles on Reputation, I'll discuss that one of the ten strategies to improving the reputation of your agency is treating your clinicians as you would like them to treat your patients and clients.  We expect our clinicians to educate our patients and clients on treatment modalities, different treatment alternatives, risks and benefits for each, and the latest trends.  Our patients and clients also come with an array of questions, and our clinicians need to be prepared to handle them. Further, with clinical knowledge growing every single day, how do we expect our clinicians to keep up?  Treating them in a way similar to what we expect them to treat our patients and clients is a powerful strategy to restore, establish, and maintain a great reputation for our agency, and it is a primary reason why it is essential to provide ongoing training to our clinicians. 

 

Successful recruitment

Training Your Clinicians: 5 Reasons Why

Here are 4 critical strategies on successful recruitment:

(1) Establish a supportive community at your agency;

(2) Make training available for your staff;

(3) Provide opportunities for growth; and

(4) Promote excellence.  

 

You can both establish a supportive community and promote excellence at your agency by making training available for your staff.  This in turn will help with successful recruitment. 

 

Burnout

Training Your Clinicians: 5 Reasons Why

Addressing burnout is an additional strategy to successful recruitment and also a reason why we need to train our clinicians.  Up to 67% of our mental health staff experience burnout, and they show it through cynicism, depression, and lethargy.  

In previous articles on this topic, I explained that the ramifications of burnout could be devastating for our patients and clients, for our clinicians and advocates, for our agencies, and for the system, as a whole.  Remember that burnout can and must be prevented.  Making training available for our staff is a sure way to address and help prevent burnout.

 

Empowerment

Training Your Clinicians: 5 Reasons Why

“Some men have thousands of reasons why they cannot do what they want to, when all they need is one reason why they can,” said Martha Graham, the American modern dancer and choreographer, whose style and technique reshaped American dance.  

 

All the above reasons are crucial ones for us to do our best to train our clinicians.  This current one is special, because it encompasses many of the other reasons.  When our clinicians feel empowered, they experience an increase in job satisfaction and career gratification, and they will be better able to “think on their feet”—react decisively without prior planning—make difficult decisions, and continue to grow in their profession under different circumstances.  Once again, all the above reasons are crucial, but if you were to pick one reason why for training your clinicians, think empowerment and all the associated benefits.

 

“I am working on a training grant for our clinicians, and I need key points to add. Can you recommend some?” Carol, the director of the grant department at the HOPE Care Center articulated these words in consultation with Rodis. “The key points to make in a training grant application are various, some more obvious than others. As a start, let us look at the reasons why agencies should make training available to their clinicians,” responded Rodis.

The five reasons why of training your clinicians:

(1) Productivity

(2) Agency reputation

(3) Successful recruitment

(4) Burnout

(5) Empowerment 

 

Which of these five reasons makes the most sense for your agency?

 

Contact us and let us know how we can help.  Thank you for reading and we look forward to next time.


For more in this series of articles, check below!


SWEET Institute- Mardoche Sidor, MD

Dr. Sidor is quadruple board certified in psychiatry, with board certification in General adult, Child and adolescent, Addiction, and Forensic, psychiatry. He also has additional training in public psychiatry, in several treatment modalities, in addition to his teaching, supervision, mentorship, coaching, and management, experience. Some of his passions are public speaking, leadership, entrepreneurship, and research, in addition to program development and project management. His overall goal is to empower all health care professionals throughout the United States and globally, towards ensuring the continuity of excellent patient care, while balancing the need to take care of themselves. Dr. Sidor is the main instructor for the SWEET Institute, and he is currently an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University. He is also the past-Medical Director for CASES (Center for Alternative Sentencing and employment Services), and he speaks and writes fluently in four (4) languages—French, English, Spanish, Creole, and has intermediate proficiency in Portuguese and Italian.


References:

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  2. Aguinis H. 2009. Performance Management. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall. 2nd ed.

  3. Arago ́n-Sa ́nchez A, Barba-Arago ́n I, Sanz-Valle R. 2003. Effects of training on business results. Int. J. Hum. Resour. Manag. 14:956–80

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  5. Kozlowski SWJ, Brown KG, Weissbein DA, Cannon-Bowers JA, Salas E. 2000. A multi-level perspective on training effectiveness: enhancing horizontal and vertical transfer. In Multilevel Theory, Research, and Methods in Organizations, ed. KJ Klein, SWJ Kozlowski, pp. 157–210. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

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