Borderline Personality

Borderline Personality Disorder: 2 Commandments to Follow

Borderline Personality Disorder: 2 Commandments to Follow

“She calls me multiple times a day, at any time, expecting me to just pick up. I don’t know what to do anymore.” Leila was quite irritated, as she articulated these words to Rodis, the consultant to the HOPE Clinic. However, there are 10 Commandments to follow when working with patients and clients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder. In this article we review the first two.

Borderline Personality Disorder: The Role of the Agency and the System

Borderline Personality Disorder: The Role of the Agency and the System

A lack of purpose and direction in treatment has been one of the factors contributing to feeling drained when working with patients and clients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder. This draining propensity is rather common; it adds to negative countertransference and leads to clinician resistance to working with these patients and clients.

Borderline Personality Disorder: Clinicians’ Responsibility

Borderline Personality Disorder: Clinicians’ Responsibility

Prior to learning the skills, exploring the reasons why of the skills helps put things into context and helps prepare the terrain for a successful implementation. Strong Countertransference, Draining Propensity, and Splitting Ability are the three reasons why it is crucial for us as clinicians to learn and master the skills for working with patients and clients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder.

Borderline Personality Disorder: What Is Needed

Borderline Personality Disorder: What Is Needed

Characterized by a long-term pattern of an unstable sense of self, unstable relationships with others, and profound difficulties with self-regulation, Borderline Personality Disorder is the most common of the ten personality disorders. A prevalence of 1.6% makes it more common than Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder, and, sadly, it has been highly stigmatized both by the non-clinician and us, the mental health professional and provider.

Skills for Working with Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder: 2 Commandments

Skills for Working with Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder:  2 Commandments

“This is the most difficult client I have ever had to treat. She calls me multiple times a day, at any time, expecting me to just pick up. I don’t know what to do anymore.” Leila was quite irritated, as she articulated these words to Rodis, the consultant to the HOPE Clinic. However, there are 10 Commandments to follow when working with patients and clients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder. In this article we review the first two.

Skills for Working with Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder (agency and system’s perspective)

Skills for Working with Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder (agency and system’s perspective)

A lack of purpose and direction in treatment has been one of the factors contributing to feeling drained when working with patients and clients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder. This draining propensity is rather common; it adds to negative countertransference and leads to clinician resistance to working with these patients and clients.

Skills for Working with Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder (Clinician’s Perspective)

Skills for Working with Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder (Clinician’s Perspective)

Prior to learning the skills, exploring the reasons why of the skills helps put things into context and helps prepare the terrain for a successful implementation. Strong Countertransference, Draining Propensity, and Splitting Ability are the three reasons why it is crucial for us as clinicians to learn and master the skills for working with patients and clients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder.

Skills for Working with Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder (Client’s perspective)

Skills for Working with Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder (Client’s perspective)

Characterized by a long-term pattern of an unstable sense of self, unstable relationships with others, and profound difficulties with self-regulation, Borderline Personality Disorder is the most common of the ten personality disorders. A prevalence of 1.6% makes it more common than Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder, and, sadly, it has been highly stigmatized both by the non-clinician and us, the mental health professional and provider.