Client Engagement

Engagement Skills: What We are Likely Missing

Engagement Skills: What We are Likely Missing

Given the crucial steps entailed in the engagement framework, it may be clear why Socratic Motivational Practice emphasizes a strong engagement, which includes the establishment of rapport and trust as a foundation for success when it comes to helping our patients and clients make healthier decisions. Nonetheless, there are additional reasons why it is crucial for us to engage our patients and clients, as well as benefits to do so. Here are the big 7.

5 Tips to Help Engage your Patients and Clients (part II)

5 Tips to Help Engage your Patients and Clients (part II)

Are you ready to make engagement part of daily practice?  As stated in Part 1 of this article series, engagement is a process; it does not happen overnight, and it requires patience, flexibility, and a different mindset, a willingness to consider a strategic approach.  As a result, to be successful, you need to desire it, and to decide to make it a priority.

5 tips to help engage your patients and clients

5 tips to help engage your patients and clients

Patient and client engagement is a challenge across all aspects of clinical care and more so in mental health, especially for those who feel forced into treatment. There is no single best definition for patient or client engagement, but I usually describe it as the active patient and client involvement in his or her care for best outcomes. 

Even the Most Challenging Patients and Clients Can Be Engaged

Even the Most Challenging Patients and Clients Can Be Engaged

“One of the main challenges we face is figuring out how to really help our patients make decisions that serve them well, without the use of coercive measures,” I pondered out loud. “This is one area in which we have been failing, despite our best studies, our best technology, and our best medicine, and we need to do something about it, if we are to make any significant changes in our healthcare system,” I added. “Mardoche, you have said it well. This is something I have been working on in my research on healthcare services, and I could not agree with you more,” responded Eric.

Engaging Challenging Patients and Clients – Wood Did It Best

Engaging Challenging Patients and Clients – Wood Did It Best

“I’m here because of Mr. Wood. For the first time, I felt like someone listened to me, treated me with respect and like a human being.” Jose said this to Danie at the front desk, when he arrived for his first follow up visit with Wood.

Engaging our Patients and Clients: When Everything Else Fails

Engaging our Patients and Clients: When Everything Else Fails

Feeling accomplished for a brief moment, Wood thought to himself, “I seem to have finally reached a significant place here. But I am not going to mess it up, and I am going to do my best to build upon this, engage Jose, establish trust, and move things forward.” He then followed the affect, vaguely commenting on Jose’s smile, building positive reinforcement, and as the session continued, went from telling Jose that he was interested in his story, to showing Jose that he was interested in his story. Now, how did he really do that?

5 Tips to Help Engage your Patients and Clients (part II)

Are you ready to make engagement part of daily practice?  As stated in Part 1 of this article series, engagement is a process; it does not happen overnight, and it requires patience, flexibility, and a different mindset, a willingness to consider a strategic approach.  As a result, to be successful, you need to desire it, and to decide to make it a priority.

5 tips to help engage your patients and clients

Patient and client engagement is a challenge across all aspects of clinical care and more so in mental health, especially for those who feel forced into treatment. There is no single best definition for patient or client engagement, but I usually describe it as the active patient and client involvement in his or her care for best outcomes. Jacob and his parents see their previous experience with mental health as negative.  Understanding Jacob's condition and crafting a treatment plan with him will require engagement—trust, listening, and dialogue.