In search of a Purpose

What it takes to Be Fulfilled: The First Need

What it takes to Be Fulfilled: The First Need

Regardless of nationality, ethnicity, cultural background or beliefs, we all have a set of needs. Theses have to be met for us to be fulfilled. Whether we were born in a home or family that valued formal education or emphasized a religious or spiritual upbringing or something else completely different, the Need Fulfillment Theory applies to all of us. Whether we were born rich or poor, male or female or carry a particular sexual orientation, there is a set of needs that must be met if we are to be fulfilled…

Combining your passion with what you are best at

Combining your passion with what you are best at

Life has its challenges, and it has its sweet spots, too. It has its highs and lows and at times one may wonder: What is life all about? Why does life have to be so challenging? Regardless of your nationality, ethnicity, socio-economic background, and profession, you may have or will at some point pose these same questions. You can go about life wondering and wandering, or you can take some time, once and for all, and do some work to find your purpose in life by finding your passion and what you are best at, by combining the two of them and formulating and implementing a plan around it.

Finding Your Passion

Finding Your Passion

Carl, a social work director, is much loved by all staff, his clients, his supervisors and colleagues.  When talking about him, some will say how nice he is, others, how contagious of a smile he has, and some others, how energetic and driven he is.  At times, they will ask him: “Carl, do you not get tired?” to which, he will respond, “I hope I do, I just learn to channel it.  I know how and when to listen to my body, how to refuel as fast as possible and I just know how to keep it going.” Carl is an example of someone who is living a life with purpose.  However, this had not always been the case.

In search of a Purpose

In search of a Purpose

Sara, a social work intern, placed in an outpatient clinic, was fortunate enough to come across Ricardo, one of the few field-instructors, who took the time to provide proper supervision and mentorship.  She admired him greatly—he was the smartest person she had ever worked with, in such fashion.  Yet, Sara questioned, “He could be doing so much more.  Why was he content with just a nine-to-five job, getting home and being with his dog and nothing else?  More importantly, is Ricardo happy; is this what I should expect for myself; is this really all there is to life after obtaining a graduate professional degree?"  Sara remained perplexed with this, still, by the end of her internship.