Emotional Pain

Clinician Burnout: Does The System Really Care?

Clinician Burnout: Does The System Really Care?

The system has its role to play. It needs to empower clinicians and advocates, patients and clients, if there are interests in decreasing staff turnover and restoring trust. If burnout is to be addressed and prevented and self-care promoted, we all have to work together. And, these efforts must be supported by the system, if we are to reach our goals and continue working effectively and with the passion with which we came into this field.

Clinician Burnout: What’s In It for Agencies?

Clinician Burnout: What’s In It for Agencies?

“It is rather strange to me that all of us in this room came into this field because we love people, we love to help, we want to make a difference in their lives, and yet, suddenly, we all feel defeated and left with a sense of helplessness and hopelessness and, sometimes, even worse than our own clients.” Paul uttered these words with frustration in his voice, as the rest of the group stared at him in disbelief and then at one another and at Rodis, the consultant and group facilitator.

Basic Integrated Care Skills for the Non-Medical Staff: 5 Reasons Why

Basic Integrated Care Skills for the Non-Medical Staff: 5 Reasons Why

Peter received home health care resident visits from multiple providers, including, nursing care, the care coordinator, and the diabetic educator, in addition to visits from Kate, the social worker.  He began sharing medical concerns and complaints with Kate that he was not sharing with the rest of the staff. However Kate was limited in her understanding and ability to best support Peter.

The Art and Science of De-escalation: A 5-Step Formula

The Art and Science of De-escalation: A 5-Step Formula

James is a patient and client at the HOPE Clinic. He is working, attending college, and planning his wedding. Two-years ago, when he first came to the clinic, through open access, things were totally different: “I am going to kill all of you. You are not here to help. All you care about is a pay check.” James yelled these words to Kellie, in the waiting area. JoAnn, Kellie’s supervisor, who was close by, heard the yelling, saw the situation, and quickly intervened.

Psychosis-Symptom Contextualization: 5 rule outs

Psychosis-Symptom Contextualization: 5 rule outs

Farah is a 49-year-old female, who complains of difficulty sleeping (insomnia), feeling sad (depressed mood), and has held the belief that her daughter, Mia, was stealing her money and was trying to poison her food (paranoia).  Ron, the psychiatrist seeing Farah for the first time, examined her and noticed a lump (nodule) in her neck, some hand tremors, and weight loss.  Ron quickly assessed for acute risk, referred Farah to an endocrinologist, who confirmed a diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, treated Farah, and the psychiatric symptoms, including paranoia, subsided.

CBT and Cognitive Distortions: 3 more

CBT and Cognitive Distortions: 3 more

“Talking about these cognitive distortions has been helpful. What are some of the other ones?" Vladimir, a colleague who previously did not think much about CBT, has now become a believer.

After providing the background on CBT and an overview of cognitive restructuring and automatic thoughts, I then started to talk with him about cognitive distortions. Here we discuss 3 more...

Engaging Challenging Patients and Clients – Wood Did It Best

Engaging Challenging Patients and Clients – Wood Did It Best

“I’m here because of Mr. Wood. For the first time, I felt like someone listened to me, treated me with respect and like a human being.” Jose said this to Danie at the front desk, when he arrived for his first follow up visit with Wood.

Basic Integrated Care Skills for the Non-Medical Staff

Basic Integrated Care Skills for the Non-Medical Staff

Peter received home health care resident visits from multiple providers, including, nursing care, the care coordinator, and the diabetic educator, in addition to visits from Kate, the social worker.  He began sharing medical concerns and complaints with Kate that he was not sharing with the rest of the staff. However Kate was limited in her understanding and ability to best support Peter.

Preventing Burnout From a System Perspective

Preventing Burnout From a System Perspective

The system has its role to play. It needs to empower clinicians and advocates, patients and clients, if there are interests in decreasing staff turnover and restoring trust. If burnout is to be addressed and prevented and self-care promoted, we all have to work together. And, these efforts must be supported by the system, if we are to reach our goals and continue working effectively and with the passion with which we came into this field.

Preventing Burn Out From the Agency Perspective

Preventing Burn Out From the Agency Perspective

“It is rather strange to me that all of us in this room came into this field because we love people, we love to help, we want to make a difference in their lives, and yet, suddenly, we all feel defeated and left with a sense of helplessness and hopelessness and, sometimes, even worse than our own clients.” Paul uttered these words with frustration in his voice, as the rest of the group stared at him in disbelief and then at one another and at Rodis, the consultant and group facilitator.

Mood Stabilizers: Lithium: 10 Things All Clinicians Need to Know

Mood Stabilizers: Lithium: 10 Things All Clinicians Need to Know

“Ron continues to ask me questions about Lithium and the effects on his kidneys and thyroid. I have no idea what he is talking about, but I want to help.” Lily articulated these words to Dawn, as they were getting ready for the weekly talk on Mood Stabilizers. “There is a lot to know about Lithium, and we could spend days just talking about it. 

Basic Integrated Care Skills for the Non-Medical Staff: 5 Reason Why

Basic Integrated Care Skills for the Non-Medical Staff: 5 Reason Why

Peter received home health care resident visits from multiple providers, including, nursing care, the care coordinator, and the diabetic educator, in addition to visits from Kate, the social worker.  He began sharing medical concerns and complaints with Kate that he was not sharing with the rest of the staff. However Kate was limited in her understanding and ability to best support Peter.

The Art and Science of De-escalation

The Art and Science of De-escalation

James is a patient and client at the HOPE Clinic. He is working, attending college, and planning his wedding. Two-years ago, when he first came to the clinic, through open access, things were totally different: “I am going to kill all of you. You are not here to help. All you care about is a pay check.” James yelled these words to Kellie, in the waiting area. JoAnn, Kellie’s supervisor, who was close by, heard the yelling, saw the situation, and quickly intervened.

Finding Your Passion

Finding Your Passion

Carl, a social work director, is much loved by all staff, his clients, his supervisors and colleagues.  When talking about him, some will say how nice he is, others, how contagious of a smile he has, and some others, how energetic and driven he is.  At times, they will ask him: “Carl, do you not get tired?” to which, he will respond, “I hope I do, I just learn to channel it.  I know how and when to listen to my body, how to refuel as fast as possible and I just know how to keep it going.” Carl is an example of someone who is living a life with purpose.  However, this had not always been the case.

Quality time with our children – 4 tips for the busy professional parent

Quality time with our children – 4 tips for the busy professional parent

Melissa, a newly hired medical director, is in charge of supervising 3 clinicians, providing direct care to her own caseload, and managing the productivity reports of all the clinic staff.  Melissa is happily married and also the mother of 2 young children, ages 2 and 4 years.  She is fully satisfied with her childcare arrangements during the day, comforted that her children are safe and well taken care of.  But scheduling childcare is not without its challenges. 

Psychosis-Symptom Contextualization

   Psychosis-Symptom Contextualization

Farah is a 49-year-old female, who complains of difficulty sleeping (insomnia), feeling sad (depressed mood), and has held the belief that her daughter, Mia, was stealing her money and was trying to poison her food (paranoia).  Ron, the psychiatrist seeing Farah for the first time, examined her and noticed a lump (nodule) in her neck, some hand tremors, and weight loss.  Ron quickly assessed for acute risk, referred Farah to an endocrinologist, who confirmed a diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, treated Farah, and the psychiatric symptoms, including paranoia, subsided.

10 tips for supporting someone through emotional pain and loss

"Samantha, a 36-year-old woman, comes to see her clinician after experiencing the devastation of a severe hurricane in her birth country. She brings her 12-year-old daughter, Marilyn, whose father is yet to be found since the hurricane. Her grandmother has been pronounced dead, and one of her siblings is severely injured. Both Samantha and Marilyn sit in the office, sobbing. Samantha is trying to comfort her daughter, but clearly she also needs someone to console her."