Engagement

Clinician Burnout: Does The System Really Care?

Clinician Burnout: Does The System Really Care?

The system has its role to play. It needs to empower clinicians and advocates, patients and clients, if there are interests in decreasing staff turnover and restoring trust. If burnout is to be addressed and prevented and self-care promoted, we all have to work together. And, these efforts must be supported by the system, if we are to reach our goals and continue working effectively and with the passion with which we came into this field.

Basic Integrated Care Skills for Non-Medical Staff: Likelihood of Death

Basic Integrated Care Skills for Non-Medical Staff: Likelihood of Death

Kate looked at Roger and said: “I am feeling more and more empowered each day. Peter is opening up to me.  However, he keeps talking about dying and about his non-stop cough.  How do I best support him?”

Many of the same principles required for supporting someone going through pain and loss can also be applied to assisting someone who is battling a terminal illness.  

Basic Integrated Care Skills for the Non-Medical Staff: 5 Reasons Why

Basic Integrated Care Skills for the Non-Medical Staff: 5 Reasons Why

Peter received home health care resident visits from multiple providers, including, nursing care, the care coordinator, and the diabetic educator, in addition to visits from Kate, the social worker.  He began sharing medical concerns and complaints with Kate that he was not sharing with the rest of the staff. However Kate was limited in her understanding and ability to best support Peter.

5 De-escalation Principles to Master

5 De-escalation Principles to Master

“What are you laughing about; why are you laughing at me?” Castro asked these questions during his visit with Jack in the ER. He started to raise his voice, then he got up, made a fist, and as the situation escalated, he ended up in restraints.

The Art and Science of De-escalation: A 5-Step Formula

The Art and Science of De-escalation: A 5-Step Formula

James is a patient and client at the HOPE Clinic. He is working, attending college, and planning his wedding. Two-years ago, when he first came to the clinic, through open access, things were totally different: “I am going to kill all of you. You are not here to help. All you care about is a pay check.” James yelled these words to Kellie, in the waiting area. JoAnn, Kellie’s supervisor, who was close by, heard the yelling, saw the situation, and quickly intervened.

5 Tips to Help Engage your Patients and Clients (part II)

5 Tips to Help Engage your Patients and Clients (part II)

Are you ready to make engagement part of daily practice?  As stated in Part 1 of this article series, engagement is a process; it does not happen overnight, and it requires patience, flexibility, and a different mindset, a willingness to consider a strategic approach.  As a result, to be successful, you need to desire it, and to decide to make it a priority.

5 tips to help engage your patients and clients

5 tips to help engage your patients and clients

Patient and client engagement is a challenge across all aspects of clinical care and more so in mental health, especially for those who feel forced into treatment. There is no single best definition for patient or client engagement, but I usually describe it as the active patient and client involvement in his or her care for best outcomes. 

Social Determinants of Health

Social Determinants of Health

Common to most community health clinics, waiting areas are usually crowded with patients to be seen, and it was no different this time for staff psychiatrist, Dr. Davidman. Though newly recruited, he managed to quickly develop a “well-liked” reputation with patients, generally greeting everyone waiting to be seen. "I notice many things in this waiting area, but one thing catches my attention the most: many clients and patients often stop me to ask for food." This was the doctor’s personal reflection about complex issues that needed direct attention.

Engaging Challenging Patients and Clients – Wood Did It Best

Engaging Challenging Patients and Clients – Wood Did It Best

“I’m here because of Mr. Wood. For the first time, I felt like someone listened to me, treated me with respect and like a human being.” Jose said this to Danie at the front desk, when he arrived for his first follow up visit with Wood.

Basic Integrated Care Skills for Non-Medical Staff: Likelihood of Death

Basic Integrated Care Skills for Non-Medical Staff: Likelihood of Death

Kate looked at Roger and said: “I am feeling more and more empowered each day. Peter is opening up to me.  However, he keeps talking about dying and about his non-stop cough.  How do I best support him?”

Many of the same principles required for supporting someone going through pain and loss can also be applied to assisting someone who is battling a terminal illness.  

Basic Integrated Care Skills for the Non-Medical Staff

Basic Integrated Care Skills for the Non-Medical Staff

Peter received home health care resident visits from multiple providers, including, nursing care, the care coordinator, and the diabetic educator, in addition to visits from Kate, the social worker.  He began sharing medical concerns and complaints with Kate that he was not sharing with the rest of the staff. However Kate was limited in her understanding and ability to best support Peter.

Preventing Burnout From a System Perspective

Preventing Burnout From a System Perspective

The system has its role to play. It needs to empower clinicians and advocates, patients and clients, if there are interests in decreasing staff turnover and restoring trust. If burnout is to be addressed and prevented and self-care promoted, we all have to work together. And, these efforts must be supported by the system, if we are to reach our goals and continue working effectively and with the passion with which we came into this field.

Why Do Patients and Clients Display Inappropriate Behaviors: 2 Reasons Why

Why Do Patients and Clients Display Inappropriate Behaviors: 2 Reasons Why

Dealing effectively with inappropriate behaviors entails looking at why our patients and clients display inappropriate behaviors.  This involves a root cause analysis, using the “Rule of 9,” as I presented in a previous article, and using the bio-psycho-social and cultural approach.  Traumatic brain injury and substance use are two biological-contributing factors.

How to Effectively Deal with Inappropriate Behaviors: “The Rule of 9”

How to Effectively Deal with Inappropriate Behaviors: “The Rule of 9”

In my articles and during SWEET seminars, I often talk about the problem-solving process, and I remind clinicians that part of the process is to first formulate and agree upon the exact defining problem.  I also explain that the next step is to seek to understand what is causing the problem in the first place.  No, I am not talking about the immediate cause.  I am talking about the root cause, and for that we need to go through the process of a root cause analysis.  A root cause analysis may come across as a daunting task.  While it is, indeed, far from a quick fix, we can adopt the “Rule of 9” to help simplify it.

Dealing Effectively with Inappropriate Behaviors- Five Steps

Dealing Effectively with Inappropriate Behaviors- Five Steps

“I need to make a decision.  I have been working for the past eight months with him, but there has been no progress.”  Maria explained this to Jena, the new clinical supervisor, only one week on the job. Maria was referring to Ken, already introduced in a previous article entitled, Dealing Effectively with Inappropriate Behaviors: The Why. 

Dealing Effectively with Inappropriate Behaviors: The Why

Dealing Effectively with Inappropriate Behaviors: The Why

“I have been giving him the benefit of the doubt, but things have been worsening.  Now I dread meeting with him, and I drag myself to work on the days I know he is scheduled to see me.” 

Maria was teary when she articulated these words to Gaelle, one of her co-workers.

Likelihood of Death: The 10 Reasons Why

Likelihood of Death: The 10 Reasons Why

Kate looked at Roger and said: “I am feeling more and more empowered each day. Peter is opening up to me.  However, he keeps talking about dying and about his non-stop cough.  How do I best support him?”

Many of the same principles required for supporting someone going through pain and loss can also be applied to assisting someone who is battling a terminal illness.  

Basic Integrated Care Skills for the Non-Medical Staff: 5 Reason Why

Basic Integrated Care Skills for the Non-Medical Staff: 5 Reason Why

Peter received home health care resident visits from multiple providers, including, nursing care, the care coordinator, and the diabetic educator, in addition to visits from Kate, the social worker.  He began sharing medical concerns and complaints with Kate that he was not sharing with the rest of the staff. However Kate was limited in her understanding and ability to best support Peter.

5 De-escalation Principles to Master

5 De-escalation Principles to Master

“What are you laughing about; why are you laughing at me?” Castro asked these questions during his visit with Jack in the ER. He started to raise his voice, then he got up, made a fist, and as the situation escalated, he ended up in restraints.

The Art and Science of De-escalation

The Art and Science of De-escalation

James is a patient and client at the HOPE Clinic. He is working, attending college, and planning his wedding. Two-years ago, when he first came to the clinic, through open access, things were totally different: “I am going to kill all of you. You are not here to help. All you care about is a pay check.” James yelled these words to Kellie, in the waiting area. JoAnn, Kellie’s supervisor, who was close by, heard the yelling, saw the situation, and quickly intervened.