Mission

Clinician Burnout: What’s In It for Agencies?

Clinician Burnout: What’s In It for Agencies?

“It is rather strange to me that all of us in this room came into this field because we love people, we love to help, we want to make a difference in their lives, and yet, suddenly, we all feel defeated and left with a sense of helplessness and hopelessness and, sometimes, even worse than our own clients.” Paul uttered these words with frustration in his voice, as the rest of the group stared at him in disbelief and then at one another and at Rodis, the consultant and group facilitator.

Clinician Burnout: Can It Be Prevented?

Clinician Burnout: Can It Be Prevented?

After experiencing a phenomenon for so long, it becomes the new normal, the new culture, which is then very challenging to change or undo. It is going to be a slow process, which requires a collective effort from all of us—clinicians, advocates, agency leaders and decision makers—and from the system, as a whole. It will be a process, but it indeed starts with understanding “The Why” of preventing burnout and promoting self-care.

Borderline Personality Disorder: Clinicians’ Responsibility

Borderline Personality Disorder: Clinicians’ Responsibility

Prior to learning the skills, exploring the reasons why of the skills helps put things into context and helps prepare the terrain for a successful implementation. Strong Countertransference, Draining Propensity, and Splitting Ability are the three reasons why it is crucial for us as clinicians to learn and master the skills for working with patients and clients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder.

Symptom Contextualization: 2 Reasons Why

Symptom Contextualization: 2 Reasons Why

“I used to just equate hearing voices with schizophrenia,” said Clara, a clinician employed at the Hope Center. “Now, I know how naive of me that was. I walked in the room expecting it to be psychosis related to schizophrenia, not realizing that it could have been a physical or a different mental health issue. I feel embarrassed and wonder how often I have misdiagnosed clients who have been under my care,” Clara added.

Skills for Working with Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder (Clinician’s Perspective)

Skills for Working with Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder (Clinician’s Perspective)

Prior to learning the skills, exploring the reasons why of the skills helps put things into context and helps prepare the terrain for a successful implementation. Strong Countertransference, Draining Propensity, and Splitting Ability are the three reasons why it is crucial for us as clinicians to learn and master the skills for working with patients and clients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder.

Preventing Burn Out From the Agency Perspective

Preventing Burn Out From the Agency Perspective

“It is rather strange to me that all of us in this room came into this field because we love people, we love to help, we want to make a difference in their lives, and yet, suddenly, we all feel defeated and left with a sense of helplessness and hopelessness and, sometimes, even worse than our own clients.” Paul uttered these words with frustration in his voice, as the rest of the group stared at him in disbelief and then at one another and at Rodis, the consultant and group facilitator.

Preventing Burnout: Why Self-Care for Clinicians and Advocates

Preventing Burnout: Why Self-Care for Clinicians and Advocates

After experiencing a phenomenon for so long, it becomes the new normal, the new culture, which is then very challenging to change or undo. It is going to be a slow process, which requires a collective effort from all of us—clinicians, advocates, agency leaders and decision makers—and from the system, as a whole. It will be a process, but it indeed starts with understanding “The Why” of preventing burnout and promoting self-care.

In search of a Purpose

In search of a Purpose

Sara, a social work intern, placed in an outpatient clinic, was fortunate enough to come across Ricardo, one of the few field-instructors, who took the time to provide proper supervision and mentorship.  She admired him greatly—he was the smartest person she had ever worked with, in such fashion.  Yet, Sara questioned, “He could be doing so much more.  Why was he content with just a nine-to-five job, getting home and being with his dog and nothing else?  More importantly, is Ricardo happy; is this what I should expect for myself; is this really all there is to life after obtaining a graduate professional degree?"  Sara remained perplexed with this, still, by the end of her internship.

The Dual Advocate

During the past eleven years since entering the field of social work, I have learned that this profession to which I have I felt a strong call has come to mean many things, requiring multiple hats, and a broad skillset.  And these skills required for social work, perhaps like anything else, need to be honed over time, throughout one’s career.  Although I consider myself still quite young in the profession, especially if I consider the big–picture–grand scheme of things, I have become pretty confident that paramount among the skills of social work is the role related to advocacy.

Why SWEET supports social workers and other health professionals?

Before now, the question, “Why SWEET?” has never been fully articulated in this way. But, consider a day in the life of a busy healthcare professional. It is almost, always, far from business as usual.  Deadlines, stress provoking decisions, patients and clients waiting to be seen, and unexpected surprises become the norm, more so than the exception. If you consider front line clinicians, often out in the field, the situation can be even more complex.