De-escalation

De-escalation Skills: A Summary of the Why’s

De-escalation Skills: A Summary of the Why’s

Mastering the skills of de-escalations is “win-win” for the clinician and advocate, the patients and clients, and the agencies, and the police officers, and system, as a whole. De-escalations skills give us the right language and tools to use with our patients and clients, the right principles and techniques to apply, the steps to take, and the do’s and don’ts to ensure everyone remains safe in the process.

5 De-escalation Principles to Master

5 De-escalation Principles to Master

“What are you laughing about; why are you laughing at me?” Castro asked these questions during his visit with Jack in the ER. He started to raise his voice, then he got up, made a fist, and as the situation escalated, he ended up in restraints.

The Art and Science of De-escalation: A 5-Step Formula

The Art and Science of De-escalation: A 5-Step Formula

James is a patient and client at the HOPE Clinic. He is working, attending college, and planning his wedding. Two-years ago, when he first came to the clinic, through open access, things were totally different: “I am going to kill all of you. You are not here to help. All you care about is a pay check.” James yelled these words to Kellie, in the waiting area. JoAnn, Kellie’s supervisor, who was close by, heard the yelling, saw the situation, and quickly intervened.

De-escalation Skills: 5 Reasons Why Patients and Clients are likely to escalate

De-escalation Skills: 5 Reasons Why Patients and Clients are likely to escalate

“How dare you tell me I can’t leave; who do you think you are?  How dare you?”  Harry spoke these words loudly and in anger to Nate, a forensic social worker, who was meeting with him for the first time, for an evaluation.  

De-escalation skills: 6 Reasons Why

De-escalation skills: 6 Reasons Why

“I went to look for help, and now I am going to jail. What do I need to live for?” Matthew said in anger to the medical student conducting the initial interview. Two days later, he was found tying the bed sheet around his neck. His roommate arrived soon enough, and he was placed on “one-to-one” monitoring for suicide watch. After discharge, Matthew found himself in jail, waiting for trial. Three days later, he was found once again, with his bed sheet around his neck, this time, unconscious.

5 De-escalation Principles to Master

5 De-escalation Principles to Master

“What are you laughing about; why are you laughing at me?” Castro asked these questions during his visit with Jack in the ER. He started to raise his voice, then he got up, made a fist, and as the situation escalated, he ended up in restraints.

The Art and Science of De-escalation

The Art and Science of De-escalation

James is a patient and client at the HOPE Clinic. He is working, attending college, and planning his wedding. Two-years ago, when he first came to the clinic, through open access, things were totally different: “I am going to kill all of you. You are not here to help. All you care about is a pay check.” James yelled these words to Kellie, in the waiting area. JoAnn, Kellie’s supervisor, who was close by, heard the yelling, saw the situation, and quickly intervened.

De-escalation Skills: 5 Reasons Why Patients and Clients are likely to escalate

 De-escalation Skills: 5 Reasons Why Patients and Clients are likely to escalate

“How dare you tell me I can’t leave; who do you think you are?  How dare you?”  Harry spoke these words loudly and in anger to Nate, a forensic social worker, who was meeting with him for the first time, for an evaluation.  

De-escalation skills: 6 Reasons Why

De-escalation skills: 6 Reasons Why

Matthew is a client at the Healing Outpatient Clinic. All had been well for 8 months until he started missing his follow-up appointments.  Two months after his last visit, Matthew arrived at the clinic, at 4:40pm, asking to be seen.  His interactions with the front desk staff, his therapist, and psychiatrist were all “different” this time, threatening and immediately prompted a 911 call; Matthew began to resist, hitting two of the officers who were trying to get him to cooperate towards an emergent hospital admission. During the inpatient hospitalization…